The Social Enterprise Awards Scotland 2017

The Ally Bally Bee Project, the social enterprise behind the world’s first personalised children’s book about dementia, has been shortlisted for The Social Enterprise Awards Scotland 2017. The awards celebrate the amazing work of social enterprises throughout Scotland – with winners being announced at an awards ceremony in The Scottish Parliament in November.

The Ally Bally Bee Project, run by Matthew Adams, Nina Aikas and wee Lana – an Edinburgh based family – aims to ease distress for children and families affected by dementia while also raising money for dementia charities such as Alzheimer Scotland, Alzheimer’s Society and many other national and international organisations.

After successfully raising more than £10,000 through a Kickstarter campaign earlier this year, the book is now available to buy online – and can be delivered anywhere in the world. It has been written by Elvira Ashby, illustrated by Daisy Wilson and designed by Jody Hogg.

Matthew Adams, Project Founder, said, “it’s an honour to be nominated in the ‘one to watch’ category at the Social Enterprise Awards. We’re just a small team doing this in our spare time so it’s nice to know our hard work is being recognised. And to attend the ceremony at The Scottish Parliament, regardless of whether we win or not, will be a win in itself.

“Dementia affects every family differently – which is why we wanted to create a children’s book that was relevant to YOUR family’s situation.”

Imagine explaining Granny’s dementia to little Sophie with a book where both Granny and Sophie feature as the main characters. From names to dementia-related behavioural traits – the end product is a beautifully illustrated, personalised, book about the dementia in your family. Via www.allyballybee.org, the book can be ordered in hardcopy or electronic format.

Matthew explained: “the idea of creating a personalised children’s book about dementia came to me about two years ago. Nina’s grandmother had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and I recall one evening, sitting around the table with the family, discussing the way her gran had been acting and the things she had been saying. It was tricky enough for us adults to make sense of – so how would a child make sense of it? It got me thinking: how would I explain granny’s dementia to my daughter?”

Worldwide, around 47 million people have dementia so The Ally Bally Bee Project plans to offer translated versions of their book. The team also hope to explore other difficult subjects for future books – such as mental health, autism and cancer. Books that can be made by you in minutes but loved by them for life.

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The Ally Bally Bee Project

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The Ally Bally Bee Project
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